Category: Graded Music Exams

Am I Ready to Take My Rockschool Exam?

February 25th, 2021 by

With spring just around the corner, we’re looking ahead to the next session of Rockschool exams in the UK and Ireland.

We have a wide range of assessment options available to accommodate all learners, so whether you’re keen to do a face to face exam, a video exam, or include classical pieces as part of our Free Choice Piece expansion, we have you covered!

For some, it’s hard to know when you or your students are truly ready to apply. This is why we’ve asked guest blogger, guitarist and educator, Leigh Fuge, to explore ‘Am I Ready to Take My Rockschool Exam?’

MGR Music’s Leigh Fuge explores…

Am I, or my students, ready to take my Rockschool exam? The golden question! What do we consider being ready for an exam? The exam will follow the same structure and contents that would have been covered in lessons using the Rockschool books. So, with that in mind, let’s break it down into a few simple areas:

Technical Knowledge

  • If you get asked to play a particular chord or scale, or variations of this, can you/your student do so without hesitation?
  • Is the chord played cleanly without any wrong notes and its pitching clean and concise?
  • Is the scale played correctly with all notes at an even tempo?

Performance

  • Are you using a performance piece from the book or do you have a pre-prepared one?
  • Can you perform this from memory or comfortably whilst reading from the book/sheet?
  • Can you deliver a confident performance that sounds as close to the original as possible?

Theory/Listening

  • Can you answer a range of listening based questions on time signatures, rhythm and melody without hesitation?
  • Can you replicate different rhythms and melodies from hearing them?

If you can answer yes to all or most of these questions, then chances are you, or your student, are ready to take the Rockschool exam.

For teachers, I would always recommend spending a few lessons running over the content in an exam format as a mock test with students to help them get used to only having one attempt at playing pieces or answering questions.

When preparing for exams, it’s important to be as relaxed and comfortable as possible. Here is a useful blog I wrote on Recovering from Mistakes During Exams. This will help you and your students prepare for mistakes. Remember, making mistakes does not ruin the exam. Keep calm and focused and you’ll nail it!

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About the Author:

This article has been written for Rockschool on behalf of MGR Music by Leigh Fuge, a professional guitarist, tutor and journalist from Wales in the UK. He has been working in the music industry for over 10 years as a touring and studio musician with various artists, guitar tutor and writer for many high profile guitar publications. Read more of Leigh’s pieces relating to Rockschool here…

Examination Update: COVID-19

February 24th, 2021 by

The UK government has announced that from 8th March 2021 new guidance will be in place to aid music, dance and drama teaching to resume in school settings, including extra-curricular activity, and out of schools settings.

At RSL Awards, we are aware of the different approaches being taken across England, Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland and that you will be working out what the latest guidance means for you, your colleagues, parents and students.

As an educational activity, RSL graded music exams are set to continue where possible. Please see our Exam Safety Guidelines for details of how we run exams in a safe environment.

Some exams are conducted in third-party venues, and it is possible that certain exam sessions may have to be postponed. Candidates will be contacted if their exam is affected and alternative solutions will be made. Please check this page regularly as the situation may change.

Teaching in Schools

We are delighted that students at schools in England can continue progressing with their Music and Performance Arts Awards grades, whilst building their confidence in performing and supporting their general wellbeing.

The scheduled and phased reopening of educational and live music settings means that RSL Awards are in a good position to book exam days at your venue and would love to allocate an examiner for your students as soon as possible!

We are also very pleased to announce that we are now able to offer Live Video Exams at Home or a Virtual Private Day for music schools / teachers where it is not viable for an examiner to visit your venue in person. This is available exclusively for venues looking to run exam days for their own students.

To discuss your exam options in more detail, contact business@rslawards.com

For VQ COVID-19 updates, please click here…

Private Teaching

From 8 March 2021 private face-to-face teaching can resume under certain circumstances. Please head to the advice pages from the ISM for detailed advice relevant to you. Peripatetic teachers, including staff from music education hubs, can continue to engage with schools as part of the school’s music, dance and drama provision and are able to move between different schools.

Please keep this page bookmarked, as we will update it if any guidance changes.

Face-to-face Exams

Join us at your local public exam centre! All RSL Awards face-to-face graded music exams continue to be subject to strict safety guidelines. Our thorough safety protocols and procedures are here to stay as the safety of our examiners, candidates, staff and parents remains our number one priority.

DOWNLOAD THE GRADED MUSIC EXAM SAFETY GUIDANCE

Recorded Video Exams

RSL’s digital exam solution! Rockschool and RSL Classical Performance Certificates or Graded Certificates (available at all grades: Debut – Grade 8) can be assessed as a video exam. Wherever you are and however you feel most comfortable, our digital solution shows our commitment to providing the most accessible exam experience possible!

LEARN MORE ABOUT RSL AWARDS VIDEO EXAMS

For more information about our Live Video Exams, please email info@rslawards.com

Free Choice Piece Expansion

We are still accepting music from other recognised exam boards so your students can get the grade that they deserve. Music in genres other than popular music, including classical, which is set for exams of other recognised boards will be automatically accepted as free choice pieces for the equivalent grade (applicable for Piano, Keyboard, Vocals and Acoustic Guitar). These performance pieces will be assessed in the same way as our own repertoire using the published RSL Awards assessment criteria, thus maintaining our high academic standards.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR FREE CHOICE PIECE EXPANSION

How to book your RSL Awards Graded Music exam…

Our online exam entry process is extremely simple. Whether you are taking an exam face-to-face or via video, you just need to fill out the online booking form which you can find here…

ENTER NOW FOR YOUR RSL AWARDS GRADED MUSIC EXAM

Rockschool and RSL Classical 2021 exam dates for your diary:

  • Exam Entry Deadline: 14th March 2021
  • Exam Period: 15th March to 2nd May 2021

ENTER NOW FOR YOUR RSL GRADED MUSIC EXAM

Don’t forget that if you would prefer to book a private exam visit or a virtual private day through our Live Video Exams at Home option, contact us at business@rslawards.com

RSL Awards have led the charge in supporting music teachers’ transition to online teaching in the face of challenging circumstances. From our supporting blog on “How To Teach Music Online” to the revolutionary RSL Learning Platform, free teaching resources via our “Teach Today, Shape Tomorrow” programme to our Digital Exam solutions, we’re doing everything we can to ensure that your students can fulfil their potential and achieve an internationally-recognised, academically rigorous qualification.

PAA Video Exams

PAA graded exams from RSL Awards can be assessed via video across its suite of qualifications thanks to Live Video and Recorded Video exam solutions.

Available for all PAA Musical Theatre, Jazz Dance, and Street Dance qualifications, Live Video Exams (LVE) are applicable for schools and exam centres.

Recorded Video Exams can be submitted by schools or venues from Premiere – Grade 8 in Music Theatre. Individuals, schools, venues or exam centres can submit Recorded Video Exams for Premiere to Grade 3 in Jazz Dance and Grades 1-3 in Street Dance.

These digital solutions are our commitment to making PAA graded exams as accessible as possible. Please flick through the tabs below to find out more about our range of video assessments.

LEARN MORE ABOUT PAA VIDEO EXAMS

Alternatively, for more information and enquiries, please contact paa@rslawards.com

If you have any queries and would like to get in touch with a member of the RSL Awards team, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us!

The Rockschool Method: General Musicianship Questions

February 16th, 2021 by

With a firm focus on cohesion and consistency at the forefront of any release, the Rockschool Method is a musical pedagogy that we hope contributes to the production of confident, self-sufficient musicians; empowered with the knowledge and ability to see their musical decisions blossom into authentic musical expression.

The General Musicianship Questions section of the exam gives each candidate the opportunity to dig deeper into aspects of music theory and appreciation, and then consider how to articulate the knowledge gained from each grade into coherent, aural statements. For some, this may seem a little daunting as first, but we promise that each candidate will get a huge amount out of this particular section. Analysis & reflection is an important part of learning in general, so we felt it applied to our exams as much as it should anything else.

Rockschool graded music exams
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Learning Outcomes

Being able to analyse and reflect effectively also involves linking a current experience to previous learning experiences (a process psychologist refer to as ‘scaffolding’). The later grades may include information that is developed from an idea introduced earlier in the syllabus, which is why we encourage that students work through each grade sequentially. We wouldn’t expect a student to work backwards as far as gaining a grade, but engaging with the syllabus in its entirety will certainly aid the progression to a proceeding exam by negating against gaps of knowledge later on.

Rockschool GMQ’s were included to get students into the habit of linking and constructing meaning from their musical experiences, enhancing the significance of each topic learnt. Reflecting on these experiences also encourages insight and the ability to grasp the more complex methods that are included in later grades. Making this an integral part of our learning rituals also means it is easier to foster our own growth – taking control of our own learning – and breathe confidence into our ability to enter into discussion with others.

GMQ’s equate to 5% of the overall mark, which, despite seeming quite a small amount, could quite easily be the difference between one grade boundary and another. It’s important to remember that one of these questions could be the reason you earn a merit or a distinction, so it’s worth preparing for this section as best you can.

Presentation

The format presented in each grade book will come in the form of four questions on music theory, and another relating to the instrument itself. The detail expected in each answer will be based on particular topics consistent with the syllabus in question. Rockschool Piano, Keys and Ukulele for example, will include one question (per instrument, per grade) on harmony, melody, rhythm, technical application and genre.

Note: These questions have been specifically generated to align with Rockschool’s Performance Pieces, so be mindful when selecting a Free Choice Piece, which may be limited in scope.

Example 1: Rockschool Drums

In this exam, candidates could be asked to identify the notated drum voices that are present within any of the performance pieces chosen for their exam (these are all explained within each grade book). They would also be asked to identify the individual parts of their drum kit (snare, hi hat, ride cymbal etc.). Then, at the other end of the grades – Drums Grade 8, for example – candidates would be asked to identify and explain some of the more complex elements of the notation, which could be in the form of explaining the chosen stylistic approach towards a solo, or the development of a given section within the piece in question.

The knowledge base that Rockschool GMQ’s can engage could be technical, performance-based, aural or visual in nature. The list of topics in each grade book is deliberately broad to ensure that each students preparation includes a wider range of subjects that can feasibly be included in the exam itself. This may seem a bit cheeky once you get out of your exam, but it’s better for you in the long run (and that doesn’t mean that something you’ve learn may not come up later on!). Being in a position to evidence this knowledge when it’s applicable later on should provide a genuinely rewarding experience, hopefully going some way to further building your confidence as a musician.

Example 2: Rockschool Guitar

Having the musical knowledge to be undaunted by any of the potential GMQ’s will always relate to the student’s ability to fully understand each of their performance pieces on their own merits. Fortunately, the required level of detail of this musical knowledge will always be commensurate to what is included at each grade. For example, in ‘Carbon Footprint – Electric Guitar grade 4’ the solo backing only outlines a Gm7 chord with no additional harmony. Therefore, the scale options for soloing over it can remain relatively simple and reflective of the scales within the technical exercises. The backing for the guitar solo within Lead Sheet at Grade 8 outlines a F#m which could appear as a similar level of difficulty. However, to maximise marks at this grade candidates are expected to use more advanced modes and scales, such as the ones present in the grade 8 technical exercises – evidencing what has been digested, specifically at this grade.

Summary

In essence, Rockschool GMQ’s are another progressive platform that helps to develop a greater awareness of what is being played as students’ progress. As the music becomes more complicated, so do the concepts behind them, which in turn must be factored into the questions posed by Rockschool examiners.

At every stage of learning; in every part of a Rockschool syllabus; broadening a students’ musical vocabulary is paramount. We believe it’s beneficial to see each section of the exam – whether it’s in the performance, the technical exercises, sight reading, improvisation, ear tests or GMQ’s – not as isolated, unrelated events; but as a collection of chapters that belong to a whole story.

…and there we have it! If you’re ready to take the plunge then click the link below to enter for your exam today!


Rockschool graded music exams
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Quick Tips: Improve Your Improvisation | Guest Blog

January 30th, 2021 by

One aspect Rockschool graded exams will assess is your ability to improvise over a pre-selected chord progression by your examiner.

While this article is written from a guitar playing point of view, you can apply the theoretic and general thought process here to any instrument in any situation.

This article has been written for Rockschool on behalf of MGR Music by Leigh Fuge.

Firstly, what is improvisation?

Improvisation is defined as a piece of music, drama or other art that is created spontaneously without prior preparation. In the music world, improvisation is often heavily associated with lead guitar playing, however all instruments have the capacity to improvise.


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While the art of improvisation is based around spontaneity and playing something that you have not prepared prior to that moment, it still has to be contextual to the piece you are improvising with. We still have to be playing in key, selecting the correct notes to improvise with and also approaching it from a stylistic perspective.

Before I improvise over a piece, I like to make a short checklist in my head that helps me get around the improvisation. I will ask myself some questions to mentally prepare myself without actually knowing what I will play:

What key is the track in?

This is obviously important. Without being in key, our improvised lines are not going to sit correctly in the track. In an exam you should be able to work out the key based on the chords given to you by the examiner. Once you’ve worked out what key you are playing in, you can then decide what scales you will be calling on for your playing.

What style is the track?

You can also use style to help choose scale types. In the lower graded exams, you will have a smaller pool of scales to choose from and as the grades increase, the scale pool will grow. If you are presented with a simple blues chord pattern in one of the minor keys then you will most likely gravitate towards a minor pentatonic, natural minor or blues scale. If the piece is more jazz orientated, perhaps some modal scales will be better suited. Use your scales to suit your stylistic playing.


What is the tempo?

Tempo doesn’t have a bearing on the scale and key choices, but it does have a bearing on the style of playing. If the piece is a slow acoustic style track, then sweep picking 16th notes on the guitar won’t be stylistically correct.

What sort of artists could this track be likened to?

Does the track sound like any artists you already know? If so, perhaps you can emulate some of their licks. How would they approach that style? What would they use to play in that way?



In my own improvisations, I often have a pool of licks in my mind that I call upon. If I’m playing a specific blues style track, I will look for licks in my head that sit with artists that may be similar. These licks are probably not going to work if I’m improvising over a power ballad or a hard rock track. I will adjust my style choices based on this.

I always think that a good approach to improvisation, especially at an early stage, is to think melodically. Think about singing a melody line and then replicating that on your instrument. Can you hum or sing along with what you’re trying to play? Vocalising lines can be a great way of working out the phrasing you want to use.



When introducing students to improvisation for the first time, I always tell them to think in a very limited range of notes. Put on a contextual backing track and choose 4 sequential notes from the scale of your choice. Use only those notes to improvise over the track for a set period of time. I encourage the use of techniques such as string bends and legato but sticking within the construct of only 4 notes.

Limiting yourself to a small number of notes make you really focus on the phrasing and how you can use a small number of notes in so many different phrasing combinations.

Try it, you’ll be surprised at less being more.

Improvisation at a more advanced level can be a great platform to trial combining scales. If there are a few scales you want to combine, the best place to start is to overlay similar scales. For instance, the minor pentatonic and natural minor scales on guitar are similar shapes. Try improvising with a hybrid of these two shapes at the same time.


About the Author:

This article has been written for Rockschool on behalf of MGR Music by Leigh Fuge, a professional guitarist, tutor and journalist from Wales in the UK. He has been working in the music industry for over 10 years as a touring and studio musician with various artists, guitar tutor and writer for many high profile guitar publications. Read more of Leigh’s pieces relating to Rockschool here…

Practise with Purpose | Forming New Habits

January 14th, 2021 by

As 2021 kicks off, we’ll be focusing on how to successfully make practising a habit so you can make some serious progress on your instrument this year.

How to Start a New Habit

Expecting drastic changes overnight is not a practical, long-term approach to improving as a musician. No matter how good your intentions are, it is highly unlikely that your new habits will stick if you set yourself unrealistic goals. You are much more likely to succeed if you introduce a new habit slowly and build it into your daily routine gradually over a longer period of time. This goes for any new skill, whether you’re learning a language, committing to regular exercise, or making time to read a book. Practising music is no exception!

Rockschool VIdeo Exams

10,000 Hours?

A popular theory is described in Malcolm Gladwell’s book, Outliers, where he claims that if you spend 10,000 hours working on a skill then you will master it and become an expert. There are certainly examples of many famous musicians practising for crazy amounts of time: Charlie Parker, a jazz colossus widely regarded as the best saxophonist ever, reportedly practised for 11-15 hours a day over a 3-4 year period. More recently, Beyoncé spent 11 hours a day rehearsing for her knockout 2018 headline set at Coachella.

practise with purpose and build a new habit
Practise With Purpose! Gradually build new habits into your daily routine.

Don’t worry – you won’t have to put in quite that much time to prepare for a Rockschool exam! Something closer to 20 or 30 minutes a day to get in the habit of practising well should do the trick to start off with. It is much more important to focus for shorter, regular sessions rather than the mammoth amounts of time mentioned above, particularly when you are starting out.

Even if you are a pro at the top of your game, between two and four hours of practice a day is about the maximum time worth doing – it will be very hard to play for any longer than that without losing concentration and slipping into unproductive work.

Baby Steps, Not Giant Steps

If you work out some small but achievable goals that prompt you to make progress by the end of your session and fulfil them, then you should be able to tell yourself (or anyone!) how you have become a better musician by the end of the session. These small, incremental improvements you make each day will quickly add up and your musical ability will start to rocket!

Rockschool’s Practise with Purpose Diary allows you to note down what you’ve been working on in specific boxes designated to Technical Exercises and Supporting Tests as well as a separate one for Performance Pieces. If you can clearly write down what your achievements were for each session then you will be on the right track.

If you’re struggling to think of what you actually achieved or, conversely, you find your notes overflowing from the box, then you might need to rethink and put a more efficient practice routine into place. When you’re immersed in something, it can be hard to take a step back and approach it objectively. Speak to your teacher about what you might need to work on in-between lessons, or find a musical friend or family member and ask them for pointers to see how you can improve next.

Anticipate Obstacles and Take Breaks!

Try not to be too hard on yourself! If you find yourself struggling with a particular part, leave it for the day and come back to it tomorrow. Strengthening weaker material is obviously key to improvement, but sometimes it’s best to be kind to yourself and come back to it another day.

We’re all human, and sometimes we overestimate how much time we’ll have to complete something – we might become ill, or other commitments simply take longer than expected and get in the way of the time we diligently set aside to practise.

This is okay! You can always make up the time another day, and you should definitely schedule in the occasional day away from your instrument. Breaks can be hugely beneficial and allow you to return with a refreshed approach another day.


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RSL Awards 2021 Graded Music Exams Available To Book Now!

January 11th, 2021 by

Achieve your next RSL Awards grade in the first graded music exam period of 2021…

The first RSL Awards graded music exam period of 2021 kicks off on the 15th March running through to 2nd May, so what better way to start the year on a positive note by earning your next graded music qualification! (Please note: video exams can be taken at any time).

Rockschool and RSL Classical 2021 exam dates for your diary:

  • Exam Entry Deadline: 14th March 2021
  • Exam Period: 15th March to 2nd May 2021

ENTER NOW FOR YOUR RSL GRADED MUSIC EXAM

Which exam format is best for you?

Face-to-face Exams

Join us at your local exam centre! All RSL Awards face-to-face graded music exams are subject to strict safety guidelines. Our thorough safety protocols and procedures are here to stay as the safety of our examiners, candidates, staff and parents remains our number one priority.

DOWNLOAD THE GRADED MUSIC EXAM SAFETY GUIDANCE

Recorded Video Exams

RSL’s digital exam solution! Rockschool and RSL Classical Performance Certificates or Graded Certificates (available at all grades: Debut – Grade 8) can be examined as a video exam. Wherever you are and however you feel most comfortable, our digital solution shows our commitment to providing the most accessible exam experience possible!

LEARN MORE ABOUT RSL AWARDS VIDEO EXAMS

For more information about our Live Video Exams, please email info@rslawards.com

Free Choice Piece Expansion

We are still accepting music from other recognised exam boards so you can get the grade that you deserve. Music in genres other than popular music, including classical, which is set for exams of other recognised boards will be automatically accepted as free choice pieces for the equivalent grade (applicable for Piano, Keyboard, Vocals and Acoustic Guitar). These performance pieces will be assessed in the same way as our own repertoire using the published RSL Awards assessment criteria, thus maintaining our high academic standards.

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR FREE CHOICE PIECE EXPANSION

How to book your RSL Awards Graded Music exam…

Our online exam entry process is extremely simple. Whether you are taking an exam face-to-face or via video, you just need to fill out the online booking form which you can find here…

ENTER NOW FOR YOUR RSL AWARDS GRADED MUSIC EXAM

Simply log in (or make an account if you haven’t already!), and follow the step-by-step process, filling in the details about which exam you would like to take. Once you’ve submitted your application, you will receive a confirmation email from RSL Awards.

Once the confirmation is received, you can sit back and relax (and practise!). We will be in contact with you about your face-to-face exam date, or your deadline date for video submission, in due course. We give a minimum of two weeks’ notice before a face-to-face exam but always aim for four wherever possible. An email notification will be sent to the address on the account which made the online entry.

For more information on the RSL Awards exam process, please head over to our FAQs page…

READ THE RSL AWARDS EXAM FAQS

RSL Classical Piano – Virtual RSL On Tour Webinars Playback

December 8th, 2020 by

Welcome to the playback of our recent Virtual RSL On Tour webinars diving into the world of RSL Classical Piano!

Led by RSL Awards’ very own Dan Francis, our team of experts hosted webinars exploring the brand new RSL Classical Piano syllabus. These three sessions were designed for you to understand the academic rigour at each level of qualification, the rationale behind the syllabus, a breakdown of what students will need to do at each grade and sample some of the repertoire included.

DOWNLOAD THE RSL CLASSICAL PIANO SAMPLE PACK

Across the graded syllabus, students and teachers will find a huge range of repertoire that makes RSL Classical Piano a truly engaging experience for all. Carefully graded to foster and support progression, RSL Classical Piano includes an exceptional selection of pieces from a diverse roster of male and female composers including some of the most cherished and admired pieces from the Classical repertoire, alongside minimalism, impressionism, jazz, and film scores.

We’re proud to have developed such a representative classical syllabus, featuring the likes of; Debussy, Clara Schumann, Alexis Ffrench, JS Bach, Elfrida Andrée, Isaac Albéniz, Mozart, Florence Price, John Williams, Zenobia Powell-Perry, Germaine Tailleferre, Chopin, Beethoven and many more

RSL Classical Piano Debut – Grade 3 (Entry Level & Level 1)

RSL Classical Piano Grades 4 – 5 (Level 2)

RSL Classical Piano Grades 6 – 8 (Level 3)

RSL Classical Piano – Syllabus Specification

RSL Classical Piano – Repertoire List

Learn more about RSL Classical Piano!

Artists in Focus | Coldplay

December 1st, 2020 by

In 1996, four young rockers wrote a collection of songs that would eventually sell over 100 million copies. The super-fans out there may recognise the band names Pectoralz and Starfish, but these days just about everyone will recognise the name Coldplay!

Written In The Stars

It was a song called “Yellow” in the year 2000 that really shot Coldplay to international fame and success. The song, from their debut album Parachutes, peaked at number 4 in the UK charts and was their first song to be received with critical acclaim all over the world. “Yellow” remains one of their most popular songs to this day, hence why it had to be included in the Rockschool Debut Drums syllabus.

Rockschool-Debut-Drums-Cover-Coldplay

“Yellow” was actually born in a studio in South Wales where the band were recording Parachutes. After a long day, they took a break and went outside. According to co-producer Ken Nelson, the night sky was looking incredible. He told the others to “Look at the stars…” and the rest is history.

Perhaps the success of Coldplay was actually written in the stars. In a video recorded on the 26th June 1998, Chris Martin delivers a warning to the cameraman that in 4 years’ time, “by the 26th June 2002”, Coldplay will be known all over the world. In an almost spooky synchronicity, exactly 4 years and 3 days later, Coldplay were headlining the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury Festival – a spot reserved only for the best in the business.

Everyday Hard Work

Things certainly did not stop after that night on the Pyramid Stage. A Rush of Blood to the Head was released in 2002 and was immediately received with praise. Then followed X&Y which was the best-selling album worldwide of 2005, and Viva la Vida or Death and All His Friends which was the best-selling of 2008 (that one won a few Grammy’s too, by the way). Since then we’ve also had Mylo Xyloto (2011), Ghost Stories (2014), A Head Full of Dreams (2015) and Everyday Life (2019). It’s safe to say that this band have been BUSY.

The band’s latest album, Everyday Life, was certainly no ordinary release. The album is split into two parts named Sunrise and Sunset. On the day of its release, Coldplay live streamed the first performance from the Amman Citadel in Jordan, both at sunrise and sunset respectively, followed by a performance from the Natural History Museum in London. Two iconic spaces that could only be reserved for a band with such chart-topping wonders.

With live streamed gigs, and lyrics that talk of longing to be back with our friends, one can’t help but think that Coldplay traversed time to predict the events of 2020. Back in March we saw frontman Chris Martin perform the #TogetherAtHome concert from his living room, powered by Global Citizen and the WHO, and with tens of thousands of fans tuning in you can imagine that he was not short of requests!

If you enjoyed the Artists in Focus blog this week, check out some other recent additions like pop-queen Ariana Grande and guitar man Ed Sheeran.

RSL Learning Platform – RSL Awards Launches Brand New App

November 5th, 2020 by

RSL Awards launch the RSL Learning Platform – the app that will transform your music teaching!

RSL Awards has developed a brand new online platform for teachers to revolutionise the way they work. Powered by MatchMySound’s automatic feedback technology, the RSL Learning Platform allows teachers across the globe to assign tasks to their students, giving learners increased focus and more precise feedback.

On signing up to RSL’s free Teacher Registry, teachers gain access to the RSL Learning Platform which includes a wealth of scores for use in RSL Awards exam as well as an abundance of features designed to make teaching more effective. The RSL Learning Platform allows teachers to pinpoint exact areas where students can improve, creating a more cohesive and personalised experience for teacher and student alike.

Join our Learning Platform webinars to find out more about the app, how you can implement it into your teaching offering and to see why your students will love it! Click here to jump down to the sign up form at the bottom of this page…

The Learning Platform gives teachers and subscribing students complete access to a huge library of RSL Awards’ grade book materials. Performance pieces and their accompanying backing tracks, technical exercises, sight reading / improvisation, and supporting tests currently available include Debut – Grade 8 in Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar, Drums, Piano and Ukulele.

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The RSL Learning Platform is equipped with Zoom integration, meaning teachers can host 1-to-1 and group video lessons via the app and upload their content to provide students with examples, demonstrations, and tutorials ahead of live teaching. Teachers can create progress reports to clarify goals for students and communicate progress to parents, meaning peripatetic teachers, classroom teachers, and music education centres can all benefit in equal measure.

For students, the RSL Learning Platform enhances the creativity and curiosity that lies at the core of musical education. Personalised goals and exemplar recordings keep students motivated as they improve every time they open the app. Their practice sessions take on renewed focus with software that allows harder bars to be slowed and repeated until they are ready to play along with backing tracks.

Much has changed over the past few months, but the principles of teaching music remain constant. Technology will never replace a skilled teacher, yet it can do so much to aid the learning process for the students who are becoming the next generation of musicians.

Teachers can gain access to all of these fantastic benefits for free by simply creating a profile on RSL’s Teacher Registry, a service that helps teachers advertise their skills to students worldwide. The RSL Teacher Registry’s importance has grown even more in the past few months, and is so crucial with the ever-increasing demand for video lessons in place of, or to supplement, lessons in person.

Early 2021 will see RSL Awards expand the repertoire available through The RSL Learning Platform to include all graded instruments.

The RSL Learning Platform has been designed to work using Google Chrome on any personal computer as well as on bespoke apps for iOS and Android. The RSL Learning Platform will work on any size or configuration of smartphone / tablet device.

JOIN THE FREE RSL TEACHER REGISTRY

STUDENTS: SIGN-UP FOR A SUBSCRIPTION!

SIGN-IN TO THE LEARNING PLATFORM

DOWNLOAD THE ‘HOW TO’ GUIDE


Join our Learning Platform Webinar!

 
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